About the Assessment

Table of Contents

  1. What is the Assessment?
  2. 2. How was the Assessment developed?
  3. Who created the Assessment?
  4. What do the results detail? How's the Assessment report organized?
  5. How is taking the Assessment beneficial to people? Why is it important to know your personality and the personality of others?
  6. How is this Assessment reliable and valid? 
  7. What implications does knowing your personality have on your life?
  8. What if some of my results don’t resonate?
  9. How does the Assessment compare to Myers-Briggs and other popular tests?
  10. Is there a “best” or “preferred” personality type? 

1. What is the Assessment?

The Assessment is a free, best-in-class personality assessment that gives rich, comprehensive insights into what someone is really like and how they interact with others.

2. How was the Assessment developed?

The Assessment was developed over a two-year intensive and creative R&D process with two goals in mind.

First, it measures traits that Ray Dalio and his team have observed and studied for many years as critical for personal and organizational success. Second, it is based on the latest research in personality science.

The Assessment combines rigorous psychometrics with years of insight derived from Dalio’s experiences building the leading investment firm, Bridgewater Associates, into what makes individuals and teams most effective.

3. Who created the Assessment?

Investor and entrepreneur Ray Dalio and psychologists Dr. Adam Grant, Dr. Brian Little, and Dr. John Golden.

4. What do the results detail? How's the Assessment report organized?

The Assessment provides detailed descriptions of views along multiple dimensions of an individual’s personality, including:

  • An overview of a person’s top 3 archetypes, which includes tendencies, talents, and opportunities for growth;
  • A deep dive into the core traits and how they are likely to play out in real life situations;
  • A comparison feature to share and examine results with friends, family, and colleagues to better understand how to relate to others.

5. How is taking the assessment beneficial to people? Why is it important to know your personality and the personality of others?

Accurate self-knowledge is critical to getting what you want out of life and to building meaningful relationships with others in both life and work. This assessment is available to everyone so they can benefit from the journey of understanding not only themselves, but their coworkers, families, friends and communities better.

6. How is this assessment reliable and valid?

The Assessment provides a person’s score on a comprehensive set of traits, their underlying facets and interactive patterns, and it has high reliability, internal structure, re-test reliability and validity of these traits and facets. The Assessment was developed with psychology experts spanning organizational, educational, and personality:

  • Brian Little

    • Professor Brian R. Little received his early education in British Columbia and his Ph.D. in personality psychology from the University of California, Berkeley. He is currently a Senior Fellow in Person-Analytics at the Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania and Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus at Carleton University. Previously, he was a Research Professor in Psychology at Cambridge University, aCommonwealth Scholar at Oxford and an Inaugural Fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard. He has received major awards for his teaching at Carleton, McGill and Harvard Universities and major innovator in the field of personality assessment and motivation. His Me, Myself and Us: The Science of Personality and the Art of Well-Being was an Amazon best seller and his TED talk “Who Are You, Really?” has been viewed on YouTube and TED platforms over 20 million times.  

  • Adam Grant

    • Adam Grant has been recognized as one of the world’s 10 most influential management thinkers, Fortune’s 40 under 40, and Wharton’s top-rated professor for 7 years. As an organizational psychologist, he is a leading expert on how we can find motivation and meaning, and live more generous and creative lives. He is the #1 New York Times bestselling author of 5 books that have sold millions of copies and been translated into 35 languages. His TED talks on original thinkers and givers and takers have been viewed more than 25 million times, and he is the host of WorkLife, a TED original podcast. His speaking and consulting clients include Google, the NBA, Bridgewater, and the Gates Foundation. He has served on the Defense Innovation Board at the Pentagon and been honored as a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum.

  • John Golden

    • John Golden, Ed.D. is the President and Founder of Golden LLC, a psychological assessment publishing company with a legacy spanning more than 50 years. Dr. Golden is the developer and author of a proprietary line of personality and values assessments. A central theme among his assessments is their positive and developmental focus designed to help people and the organizations in which they work improve, grow and succeed through a special focus on the practical and beneficial application of accurate self-knowledge and exploration. Dr. Golden’s educational background includes a unique blend of psychology, education and human resource management. His professional practice includes organizational change and development consulting and training. He has authored numerous technical manuals and support guides, and worked personally with tens of thousands of people in hundreds of organizations in for-profit, non-profit, education, government and military industrial settings.

7. What implications does knowing your personality have on your life?

To achieve success, you need to know yourself and the people around you. Knowing your personality can help you gain the self-awareness and other-awareness that are critical to making good decisions, getting things done, and turning a group of coworkers into a great team.

8. What if some of my results don’t resonate?

While most people find most of their results resonate, there may be some surprises. It’s important to remember that it’s simply based on how you answer questions relative to how others answer the same questions. They imply natural preferences rather than capabilities. If there are scores that don’t resonate immediately, we’d encourage you to read more about what they mean and reflect on whether different facets of your personality show up in different ways, or even how you may have developed compensating habits around such preferences. For instance, often people with a low preference for Detailed and Reliable have developed mechanisms like making clear to-do lists to keep them on track, It can be helpful to ask others you are close to how they see you as a way of triangulating your results. Of course no assessment is perfect. It’s a tool that is designed to help you reflect on and enable you to discover insights about yourself and others that can be useful to you in work and life. 

9. How does the Assessment compare to Myers-Briggs and other popular tests?

The Assessment compares very favorably with other personality tests in terms of internal consistency, test-retest reliability, factor structure and construct validity.  It assesses a wider array of traits than most other personality tests and subsumes Big Five traits as well as traits drawn from recent research in personality science and organizational behavior.  It is distinctive in also assessing traits based on Ray Dalio's Principles.

10. Is there a “best” or “preferred” personality type? 

In general there is no "best" or "preferred" personality type.  High levels of Extraversion, for example, might be a preferred trait in those who are looking to advance in the sales professions but not for occupations in which they are unlikely to interact extensively with others, such as a lab technician.  Also, extreme levels of some "desirable" traits may actually be less desirable than only moderately high levels.  For example, Conscientiousness is a trait that is associated with a very large range of desirable outcomes such as job performance, relationship stability and health.  But extremely high levels can be associated with behaviors that are more obsessive/compulsive than is optimal.

 

Was this article helpful?